Sundials - World's Oldest Clocks

North American Sundial Society

Sundials of North America

This is a complete listing of sundials in the North American Sundial Society Registry. Click on any dial thumbnail picture or city name to display our complete listing and images. To see sundials in a particular state or province, you may click on the list at left to see all registered sundials in that state, province or country (at bottom) displayed in city order.

 
 
Pittsburgh Pennsylvania USA Horizontal Dial 110
A horizontal dial of brass about 18 inches in diameter with a fluted edge. The gnomon is a simple design. The dial is supported by four balusters resting on a larger circular base. SUNDIAL HAS BEEN REMOVED FROM BASE
 
 
Bloomfield New Jersey USA Armillary Dial 109
An armillary sphere 5 feet in diameter, with a bronze 8 inch equatorial band holding hour marks on the inside and decorated with animals of the zodiac on the outside. A simple rod serves as the gnomon. The armillary is supported by 8 cast bronze turtles on top of a four foot cylindrical pedestal. The turtles point to the cardinal and intermediary points of the compass. This very handsome dial was made by Kenneth Lynch.
 
 
Pittsburgh Pennsylvania USA Horizontal Dial 108
A circular horizontal dial about 18 inches in diameter. The dial has been removed altogether. Dial sits atop a circular column of ornately carved white stone with spiral flutes on the lower half.
 
 
Pittsburgh Pennsylvania USA Horizontal Dial 107
A small horizontal metal dial perhaps 10 or 12 inches in diameter. The gnomon sits in the middle of the dial with an ornate cross-brace support. Surrounding the dial are two inscriptions. Gnomon is missing. The dial sits on a square stone supported by a square column of white stone.
 
 
Des Moines Iowa USA Horizontal Dial 106
This beautiful horizontal brass dial is 24 inches in diameter, cast onto a larger circle 28 inches in diameter. The dial has raised hour, half-hour, and 15-minute lines drawn in esthetic proportions from 5 am to 7pm. Roman numerals are on the outer rim. In the center to the left and right of the gnomon is a table for the Equation of Time in 15 day increments. The dial rests on four brass columns 20 inches high, which are mounted on a brass base 28 inches in diameter. The entire structure is centered on a concrete octagon 6 1/2 feet across.
 
 
Superior Arizona USA Horizontal Dial 105
A small 8 in. bronze horizontal dial with raised Arabic numerals marking the hours. The dial is set on a massive cobble stone and mortar base suitable for sitting upon while watching the hours.
 
 
Ambridge Pennsylvania USA Vertical Dial 104
Cube, about 12 in. on each side. Stone, metal gnomons Reproduction of unidentified original. Dials on all four sides and top.
 
 
Oxford Ohio USA Armillary Dial 103
A 6 foot armillary sphere on a marble column. The armillary has equatorial, meridional, polar and equatorial rings, plus two smaller ones at the poles. Along the outside of the equatorial ring are golden figures, marking the houses of the zodiac. On the inside of the equatorial ring are Roman numerals marking the hours. The armillary was a gift to the university on its 50th anniversary by the Miami chapter of Delta Delta Delta. Dial sits atop a marble column.
 
 
Dayton Ohio USA Horizontal Dial 102
A circular granite dial about 2 feet in diameter. Has an ornate, solid gnomon that looks nearly top heavy for the dial. The dial sits on a sculpted column with spreading base. Protected by brass railing that surrounds the dial in a quadrilateral monument.
 
 
Chapel Hill North Carolina USA Horizontal Dial 101
A 35 foot diameter horizontal dial of terrazzo with inset bronze hour lines and Roman hour numerals. The bronze gnomon edge is 24 feet long and at the tip stands 14 feet tall. In the base of the gnomon is a circular opening, holding a large inset bronze hour glass. In the terrazzo at the dial center is an inset bronze sun graphic with wavy spicules; this inset contains a US Coast and Geodetic Survey Triangulation Station marker. A plaque gives correction for EOT and longitude.
 
 
Long Island New York USA Horizontal Dial 100
A bronze circular horizontal dial about 18 inches in diameter. At the edge of the dial set in concentric rings are the hour lines, half hour lines, quarter hour and five minute marks. Hours are in Roman numerals from 5am to 7pm. Has a thick brass gnomon.
 
 
Ithaca New York USA Equatorial Dial 99
This 650 pound equatorial has an adjustment This setup enables the instrument to read clock time. making this a very precise instrument. The gearing rusted in 1980 and was refurbished: "The heart of the sundial's functionality, a roundish steel disc called a cam, was also replaced with a stainless steel, slightly better-functioning one, connected to an hour and minute scale by small, stainless steel cables via a pair of precisely designed pulleys." Thus the mechanical adjustment compensates the sun's irregular motion called the Equation of Time and shows civil not solar time.
 
 
Morristown New Jersey USA Horizontal Dial 98
12.75' dia. Granite with Bronze numerals 10" long. Commonly called the Washington Memorial Dial. An inscription on the octagonal base indicates this memorial is a tribute from the Daughters of the American Revolution.
 
 
Isles of Shoals New Hampshire USA Armillary Dial 97
Simple armillary dial about 2 feet in diameter sits on a triangular cut stone pedestal. The equatorial band has raised Arabic numbers at each hour. The hours are adjusted by 42 minutes to correct for zone time. The gnomon is an arrow rod of traditional fashion. The base supporting the armillary is a small hemisphere globe, with a map of the continents plainly visible. The armillary cuts the globe at the Greenwich hour line facing due north. The triangular granite stone pedestal was once part of the Captain John Smith Monument, commemorating him as the discoverer of the Isles of Shoals in 1610.
 
 
Kalamazoo Michigan USA Horizontal Dial 96
Large circular bench ca 25' in diameter forms ring with hour markings. Aluminum or stainless steel gnomon. Relatively new.
 
 
Worcester Massachusetts USA Equatorial Dial 95
ca 6' segment of cylinder, approx 3' high Metal Gnomon is intentionally omitted. Visitor stands centered in the curve of the cylinder and places finger on crossbar as directed. Shadow of finger indicates the time.
 
 
Collinsville Illinois USA Woodhenge Dial 94
At the Cahokia Mounds is a woodhenge discovered in the early 1960's during excavations and has been reconstructed. There are a series of wood posts in multiple circles that indicate various solar events such as the solstices, equinoxes, and what are thought to be special festival days related to the agricultural cycle of the region. Critical posts also align with the mounds of the site on certain dates. The outer of 3 circles of posts has a diameter of 410 feet with 48 equidistant posts. Each post is about 20 feet high. Equinox and solstice sunrise observations are held at the site on the Sunday morning closest to the event.
 
 
Halifax Nova Scotia Canada Horizontal Dial 93
Bronze horizontal dial on a granite base. Has Roman numerals showing time noting "Mean solar time in Halifax is 1 hour and 14 minutes behind Atlantic Standard Time."
 
 
Milton Massachusetts USA Vertical Decliner Dial 92
A vertical south facing dial made of painted mahogany with an aluminum gnomon. The dial is in the shape of a shield 3 foot tall by 2 1/2 foot wide, following the seal of the Milton Academy. Around the edge are the hours in Roman numeral. An Equation of Time correction table is now missing, but does not detract from the beauty of the dial.
 
 
Baltimore Maryland USA Polyhedral Dial 91
Bronze on stone. Renovated 1904 and again in 1994 (by George McDowell.). It is a 17-facet hemispherical compendium dial. Has facets calibrated for local solar time for Baltimore, Jeddo [Tokyo], Honolulu, Sitka, Pitcairn Islands, San Francisco, Cape Cod, Rio Jancito, London, Fernano Po, Cape Town, Jerusalem, and Calcutta. Has a polar and vertical dial for Baltimore time. Built in 1892 by Peter Hamilton, 19th C Baltimore stonecutter, became president of the company which supplied granite for the Library of Congress building. Repaired and reset in 1904. Reworked in 1993. The original pedestal remains, consisting of a stone pillar carved to resemble the trunk of a tree.