Sundials - World's Oldest Clocks

North American Sundial Society

Sundials of North America

This is a complete listing of sundials in the North American Sundial Society Registry. Click on any dial thumbnail picture or city name to display our complete listing and images. To see sundials in a particular state or province, you may click on the list at left to see all registered sundials in that state, province or country (at bottom) displayed in city order.

 
 
Macedon New York USA Henge Dial 408
A cornfield maze for the summer of 2000 at Long Acre Farms. Theme called "Lost in Time" features a number of sundials. The 400 x 500 foot cornfield maze, called the "largest living sundial", is in the form of a smiling sun with 12 corn hedge "rays" from 8 am to 6 pm that align in azimuth to the hour and half hour for Labor Day, 2000. Within each hedge is a vertical pole holding an "Eye of Kala" (an annulus) 12 feet above the ground that casts a spot of light across a hedge clearing at the appointed time to a sign at ground level. At the center of the maze is a horizontal dial with a 12-foot gnomon. This gnomon forms part of the smiling sun's nose when seen from the air. Just outside the corn hinge is an analemmatic sundial for visitors to tell time before going through the hinge. In the hinge, visitors are given a small altitude card dial that tells Eastern Daylight Time from June - Oct. Admission fee.
 
 
Starr's Point Nova Scotia Canada Horizontal Dial 407
A small horizontal dial, 8-inches in diameter. The dial is a fiberglass reproduction with metal gnomon upon a cement pedestal. The original dial dates from the 1820s and judging from the reproduction, is in very poor condition. Has Roman numerals, but the hour lines do not agree with the gnomon position. Very difficult to read. North edge of gnomon is cut to resemble a face in profile, possibly in reference to the inscription. On the grounds of the Charles Ramage Prescott House, built 1814 - 1816. Prescott was a merchant and horticulturalist.
 
 
Windsor Nova Scotia Canada Horizontal Dial 406
A small horizontal dial with an 11-inch square base. The dial was made in 1845, but the original was damaged by vandals. There now exists a fiberglass reproduction of the dial with metal gnomon on a cast cement base. The dial has Arabic numerals indicating 4 a.m. to 8 p.m. and corresponding hour lines. The dial is located on the grounds of the Haliburton House, built in 1836 by Thomas Chandler Haliburton, a justice of the Supreme Court of Nova Scotia and author of "The Clockmaker" stories.
 
 
Cleveland Ohio USA Horizontal Dial 405
A ground level horizontal dial 14 feet in diameter, with gnomon 5 ft 3 inches high. The dial is made of concrete, brick, and granite.
 
 
Binghamton New York USA Horizontal Dial 404
A 20-foot in diameter horizontal dial at ground level made of concrete. Part of the campus plaza. The gnomon is also concrete, approximately 8 inches wide and 5 foot tall. Place for students of SUNY Binghamton University to congregate.
 
 
Hamilton New York USA Horizontal Dial 403
A small brass horizontal dial 9 1/2 inches in diameter. Has a compass rose in the center. Hour lines branching to half hour and quarter hour. Roman numerals showing 5am to 7pm. To the south of the gnomon is a graph of the equation of time. Donated to Colgate University by Fred Sawyer. The dial sits upon a rectangular granite column.
 
 
Mount Uniacke Nova Scotia Canada Horizontal Dial 402
A faithful fiberglass replica of an ornate bronze horizontal dial stands on the Uniacke Estate. The dial is about 40 cm diameter, with a sunburst in the center showing the 16 cardinal points and intricate markings typical of a 19th century dial. Surrounding the cardinal points is a ring engraved "Watch Faster, Watch Slower" with the equation of time. Roman numerals show the hours from V in the morning to VII at evening. This dial was made for Richard Uniacke in 1815, once the Attorney-General of Nova Scotia. The original dial may be in storage in Halifax. The inscribed latitude of 45:5N does not match the Uniacke Estate location. The wooden pedestal is in rather poor condition.
 
 
Rockford Illinois USA Armillary Dial 401
A large stainless steel armillary dial approximately 10 feet in diameter. The equator and sunrise/sunset meridian bands are about 6 inches wide, with other bands about 3 inches wide. The central gnomon is a stainless steel rod with an open shaped arrow point and tail. The hours on the equatorial ring are raised bronze roman numerals with 15-minute intervals marked by bronze dots. The time marks are set for daylight saving time, with sunset at VII. Marks continue to VIII
 
 
Highland Park Illinois USA Analemmatic Dial 400
A simple analemmatic dial with a cement base with marks for standing at the months of the year. Surrounding the base is a light brick plaza with markers for the hours. The plaza is surrounded by flowers.
 
 
Centerport New York USA Vertical Dial 399
Within the gardens of the museum is a vertical dial constructed as a very colorful wall mural.
 
 
Des Moines Iowa USA Analemmatic Dial 398
An analemmatic dial of cement with inlaid brass markings for the month. The visitor to the Science Center becomes the gnomon, standing on the appropriate month marker and then casting a shadow to the appointed hour.
 
 
Fredericton New Brunswick Canada Vertical Declining Dial 397
A vertical declining dial 7 x 7 feet with parged cement face and 5 foot wrought iron gnomon. Plaque on wall reads "The sundial at the top of this wall is a faithful reconstruction of the original which Frederictonians used during the 1800s and early 1900s. The shadow cast by the gnomon (style) onto the dial accurately displays local apparent solar time." An equation of Time is included on the plaque to determine mean time. The date of the original construction of this sundial is not known, but the Soldiers Barracks were built in 1826. The dial was restored in 1992.
 
 
St. Louis Missouri USA Vertical Dial 396
A vertical decliner at the top of the Cupples I building. Given by the class of 1908. Can be seen from the courtyard of Robert S. Brookings building. In 1908 the campus newspaper, the Washington University Student Life, commented that "The new sun dial on Cupples I is now being put into position upon the tablet on the south side of the building?It will be interesting to note the discrepancy between sun time and standard time by comparing with the Varsity clock [a large time piece situated high on the west wall of Brookings Hall, with both clock and dial visible in the quadrangle]." Today the Baumont Pavilion, erected in 1965, blocks a close view of the ornate tablet and dial. Use binoculars from a distance.
 
 
St. Francesville Louisiana USA Horizontal Dial 394
A small 9 inch diameter brass horizontal dial sits on top of a cast iron pedestal. The dial face is worn, but readable with Roman numerals and 5-minute graduations. The dial plate is rotated about 40 degrees east of North. To the south of the gnomon is a 2 1/2 inch diameter mirror with unknown use. On left and right of the gnomon is scroll engraving of the equation of time. The dial sits on a 3 foot cast iron pedestal, painted adobe-red. A matching adobe-red dome cap with 8 sides covers the dial. Cap has an acorn handle lift.
 
 
Fort Union New Mexico USA Combination Dial 393
A 2 foot square stone horizontal dial on a four foot high stone pedestal with vertical dials on its faces. This dial has been removed, replaced and relocated several times. The original gnomon was lost and replaced with an incorrect 45° gnomon, which has been replaced again with a steel gnomon that appears to be at slightly less than the correct latitude angle. All vertical dial gnomons are missing. The dial and a nearby inscribed stone are on the grounds of the Third Fort Union (1863-1891). The stone dial surfaces are worn from weather, but the Arabic hour numerals are still visible.
 
 
Lloydminster Alberta Canada Horizontal Dial 392
One of the largest horizontal dials in North America. Dial is 197 feet in diameter. It's location is on the 4th meridian at 110:0 west, a line that separates Alberta and Saskatchewan and divides the city of Lloydminister in half. (Lloydminister began as a single town in 1903, but was split in 1905 with the survey that created Alberta and Saskatchewan. The town remained divided until 1930 when by joint decree it was amalgamated back into a single city).
 
 
Louisbourg Nova Scotia Canada Horizontal Dial 391
A small horizontal dial 28 cm in diameter on a limestone pedestal. The dial shows local hours with half-hour lines from 4 am to 8 pm in Roman numerals. Trefoils are interspersed with the hour labels. A south-pointing crescent or moon sits across the sub-style and a representational daisy or sun sits below the center of the dial. The base is a limestone pedestal 85 cm tall. The base is a limestone pedestal 85 cm tall. The dial is located in the Fortress of Louisbourg run by the Parks of Canada. The dial is a modern reproduction of a slate dial excavated at the site.
 
 
Branford Connecticut USA Equatorial Dial 390
This large equatorial dial was created as part of a community effort to establish a Natural Habitat park for the town of Branford. The dial is 7 x 6 x 6 feet made of Stony Creek granite and stainless steel, weighing 13,000 pounds. The granite is indigenous to the town. The face of the stone is cut at approximately 41 degrees to match the site latitude, inspired by a design from Robert Adzema "The Great Sundial Cutout Book". Dial shows time from 7 am until 5 pm.
 
 
Bumble Bee Arizona USA Horizontal Dial 389
Horizontal dial approximately 10 feet in diameter. Made of concrete and granite. Commemorates Arizona Dept. of Transportation employees who were killed in the line of duty.
 
 
Guaymas Sonora Mexico Equatorial Dial 388
Dial is of stone, carved in a thick semi-circle ring about 200 degrees in extent. Dial is 36 inches in diameter and 10 inches thick. The inner rim of the dial is a "vee" shape. The gnomon is an iron rod protruding from the equatorial ring at the 12-hour mark, and at the center of the ring turns at a right angle to align to the north pole. The massive stone dial is set on a masonry block pedestal 40x40x20 inches. The pedestal is neither level nor cardinal.