Sundials - World's Oldest Clocks

North American Sundial Society

Sundials of North America

This is a complete listing of sundials in the North American Sundial Society Registry. Click on any dial thumbnail picture or city name to display our complete listing and images. To see sundials in a particular state or province, you may click on the list at left to see all registered sundials in that state, province or country (at bottom) displayed in city order.

 
 
Watertown New York USA Vertical Dial 442
The vertical dial is on one face of a ornamental rectangular display raised on pole at the edge of the street at Key Bank Clock Plaza. The dial is approximately 2-foot square with an ornate gnomon having a "key" cutout. The dial was moved from another location to the present pole and restored. The dial is made of copper or bronze. Nearby is a plaque with the equation of time. Dedicated May 15, 1967.
 
 
Somerville Massachusetts USA Vertical Dial 441
This 5 foot x 7 foot vertical dial is painted onto the true south facing concrete wall of a commercial building. The gnomon and hour lines appear to be weathered copper or bronze. The hour lines are corrected for longitude, but may be in error by about 5 minutes. The dial is in relatively good condition, but the painted numerals are fading. The building itself has been in several hands over the last 10-15 years.
 
 
St. Augustine Florida USA Vertical Dial 440
The Cathedral-Basilica of St. Augustine was founded on Sept 8, 1565. A rectangular building 42 feet wide and 120 feet long formed the original structure, with walls of coquina, a rocklike amalgam of sea shells. A fire destroyed much of the Cathedral in 1887, but the walls survived. The reconstruction includes a new bell tower at the South end of the Cathedral. A vertical sundial is painted on the South wall of the tower about 15 feet above ground above a doorway. The dial is about 3 by 4 feet with simple lines marking the hours and quarter hours from 8 am to 5 pm. The gnomon is a simple rod and appears bent. A picture of the dial taken at 12:30 EDT on March 12 shows a shadow time of about 2;15.
 
 
Black Rock City Nevada USA Artwork Dial 439
The Pyrolarium was a sundial designed for the Burning Man Festival (1999) to shoot exploding mortars into the sky at each hour of the day. The structure was 12 feet in diameter and nearly 18 feet high. On an upper platform out of the reach of people were a series of tubes loaded with black powder. Around the perimeter of the platform were a set of Fresnel lenses, igniting them in succession throughout the day. The last mortar ignited at sunset and the Pryolarium was incinerated, as is the custom of all artwork displayed at the Burning Man Festival.
 
 
Pittsford New York USA Vertical Dial 438
This old vertical north facing dial in on the Spring House, constructed circa 1822. The building was an old Erie Canal Inn. The dial is about 48 inches high by 30 inches wide, made of wood and painted with a white boarder. The gnomon is also white painted wood and "looks upside down" because the dial faces north. The dial and gnomon have been repainted several times.
 
 
Hollidaysburg Pennsylvania USA Horizontal Dial 437
This is a large horizontal dial 10 feet in diameter, constructed of marble with a steel gnomon. The sundial was donated in honor of Courtney Leigh Clayton and is open to the public as part of the beautiful Discovery Garden.
 
 
Pittsburgh Pennsylvania USA Armillary Dial 436
Large metal armillary dial, about 6 feet in diameter. Has a double equatorial ring with Roman numerals for the hours held between the two rings. Also has horizontal and vertical rings. Dial has been removed.
 
 
Toronto Ontario Canada Horizontal Dial 435
A small bronze 8 inch diameter horizontal dial, sitting upon a granite column of equal diameter. The dial plate has simple radiating hour lines and Roman numerals. No minute or quarter hour marks. The gnomon may have broken off at some time and been repaired, since it is now held on by a rather unsightly bronze angle iron.
 
 
Jersey City New Jersey USA Horizontal Dial 434
A horizontal dial 12 feet across made of concrete and pipe.
 
 
Toronto Ontario Canada Horizontal Dial 433
A striking 30 inch diameter horizontal dial. The equation of time correction is made by a slight rocking of the gnomon about the polar axis, controlled by a manual date index and a hidden cam mechanism. At the south end of the gnomon on the dial is a sunburst design. The octagonal pedestal is ornately covered with six copper plates. Each showing two zodiac signs in relief, forming a frieze 20 inches high around the pedestal.
 
 
Fairfax Virginia USA Equatorial Dial 432
This bronze equatorial dial is about four feet in diameter with a 6 inch equatorial band containing raised Roman hour numbers from 5am to 7pm. The band is graduated every ten minutes and is offset by approximately 8 minutes to read Eastern Apparent Time. The gnomon is a simple arrow without nodus and the dial does not have an analemma. The octagonal dial base is made of brown marble panels approximately 5 feet high with a smaller octagon on top approximately 1 foot high that supports the dial. Each octagon is capped with thick granite. The base is a mausoleum, with alternate octagonal sides each containing 8 crypts.
 
 
Wellesley Massachusetts USA Horizontal Dial 431
A small 14x14 inch rose granite square dial with an unassuming 5 inch high brass gnomon sits upon a round white 3 foot high granite column. At the base is a larger granite block. Built about 1899.
 
 
Kalamazoo Michigan USA Analemmatic Dial 430
A modernistic analemmatic dial. The ellipse is a raised stone wall with large Arabic numbers for each hour from 5am to 7 pm. The concrete patio in front of the wall contains the analemmatic line of months as an indicator of where to stand for casting the shadow.
 
 
East Hartland Connecticut USA Noon Marker Dial 429
This upright stone was originally a noon marker at Nathaniel Taggart's inn in colonial North Blandford, MA. The stone was moved by Taggart's granddaughter Polly Taggart Church to Harland, CT, where she lived following her marriage. In 1935 the stone was set up in the Hartland Cemetery, casting its noon day shadow onto a flat stone with an engraved meridian line.
 
 
Sebastopol California USA Vertical Obelisk Dial 428
This is a vertical obelisk 3 foot on a side and 9 foot tall. It is more of a sun calendar than a sundial. The tip of the obelisk's shadow is tracked by marks on a concrete pad on the ground. The summer and winter solstices and equinoxes are indicated by tiles set in the pad.
 
 
Newcastle Maine USA Horizontal Dial 427
A small horizontal dial with an interesting history. In 1997 when the dial was installed, the following is quoted of designer and builder Jim Estey: "We set it by our watches," Jim said, and then glued it down to its stand. That means it cannot be reset when the sun and time changes, but visitors will have to compensate."
 
 
Portland Connecticut USA Horizontal Dial 426
An 18x18 inch square horizontal sundial with ornate engraving. Along the edge are Roman numerals telling the hours. The gnomon is equally ornate. Both dial plate and gnomon are made of brass. Dial sits on a tapered granite pedestal with a square granite cap.
 
 
Nashville Tennessee USA Vertical Dial 425
A 6 x 7 foot vertical dial declining 16.4? east of south sits above the entrance to the Science Building. The dial shows hour lines, declination lines and a noon analemma.
 
 
San Carlos California USA Vertical Dial 424
This vertical dial is approximately 4 foot high by 6 foot long, mounted on the end wall of a house that can be publicly viewed. Dial has hour lines and lines marking the equator and solstice shadow limits. Made of wood and brass.
 
 
Berkeley California USA Statue Dial 423
This is a large granite statue by Richard O'hanlon entitled "Sunstone II" and was designed in collaboration with astronomer David Cudaback. A north-south large polished granite slab has the top cut at the latitude of 38 degrees to sight the North Star. A hole in the stone allows east or west viewing, with limiting angles designed to show the extent of maximum planetary and lunar wandering. An east-west stone crosses the north side of the granite slab, allowing light to pass only at noontime onto a heel stone with marks for Equinox and Solstice. Access by admission to the Hall of Science museum