Sundials - World's Oldest Clocks

North American Sundial Society

Sundials of North America

This is a complete listing of sundials in the North American Sundial Society Registry. Click on any dial thumbnail picture or city name to display our complete listing and images. To see sundials in a particular state or province, you may click on the list at left to see all registered sundials in that state, province or country (at bottom) displayed in city order.

 
 
Hillsborough New Jersey USA Gnomonic Dial 504
A gnomonic horizontal dial constructed in bright colors on a 20 by 14 foot concrete pad. The gnomon is a vertical steel pipe 1 meter tall with a small nodus at the top. Hour lines are marked within summer and winter solstice and equatorial lines. The dial is marked with both standard and daylight local solar time. The noon line is complemented by its analemma with the months labeled. The sundial is used by Sunnymead School to aid in the science curriculum. The sundial was designed and created by Michael Folsom-Kovarik as an Eagle Scout project. Construction began on July 20, 2002 and ended on June 28, 2003. Michael was approached by Paul Stockman (the Home and School Association's treasurer) with the idea of building a sundial at Sunnymead School. Michael then came up with the design (made to keep the sundial as a useful teaching tool for the entire school day no matter what time of year) and location. After a year and a half from planning to completion, Sunnymead Elementary has a working and accurate sundial!
 
 
Wheaton Maryland USA Horizontal Dial 503
A 20 foot diameter horizontal dial in the middle of a brick patio. The gnomon, about 12 inches wide and 8 feet tall, is made of thin wood painted a verdant green and edged with molding. The dial face is a bed of flowers with hour lines of small plants, all immaculately kept by gardener and dial builder Roger Haynes. Around the circumference of the dial are Arabic number placards for each hour from 6am to 6pm. The flowers are changed seasonally for a gardener?s delight, and during the winter when the plants are dormant, the gnomon is removed and the area is used for a winter light show. John Carmichael explained the origin of the dial (July 2003): Roger Haynes is the head groundskeeper at Brookside and he came across my website somehow about two years ago and asked me to help him design a sundial for the gardens. We discussed all sorts of ideas, but settled on this untraditional yet traditional living plant design. The park was very short of funds, so Roger had to do a lot of lobbying to get it pushed through the powers that be. But I think he did a great job considering we did all our communicating via email and drawings. I can't wait to see how it will change as it grows and as they change the plants every season. Roger Hayes reports that this dial will be removed in November, 2009.
 
 
Colorado Springs Colorado USA Horizontal Dial 500
An old horizontal dial approx 60 cm diameter. From 1914-1967 was located at Marksheffel Garage, relocated to Monument Valley Park in 1967. The builder may have been van Briggle Pottery, but its history is more complex: The angles of the hour lines are consistent with a latitude of 43.9° (roughly) but the present location is 38.9°. A gnomon (probably not original) was cut for 34° lat, but has now been corrected. Likewise, the whole dial had to be rotated to true north, being off by some 47°. Hour lines have eroded, and those before 6am and after 6pm radiate from the wrong side of the gnomon. The city has spent a considerable amount of money cleaning up the area, removing the shrubs that blocked sunlight and building a nice brick wall with flowerbeds, so the area looks better, but the dial is worse than ever, with vandals bending the gnomon.
 
 
Colorado Springs Colorado USA Vertical Dial 499
A vertical dial approximately one meter square, built into the wall of the 1907 Van Briggle Pottery building. This Memorial Pottery building was erected after Artus Van Briggle's death. The Van Briggle Pottery Company is now using the Midland Railway roundhouse at Hwy 24 and 21st. In addition to hour lines with Roman numerals, surrounding tiles have pictures of the zodiac. In 1994 Colorado College repaired the gnomon and added a metal equation of time plate.
 
 
Los Altos California USA Gnomonic Dial 498
A triangular entry canopy 13 feet height by 128 feet wide by 26 feet deep at the Georgina Blach Intermediate School casts a shadow on the front pavement walkway. The pavement is etched with a gnomonic projection to show the hours and seasons. The dial was created by architects Lisa Gelfand and Andrew Davis who did considerable research for the dial. Their design was submitted to the school district for approval. It's a fun sundial and the students and teachers love it.
 
 
Albany New York USA Vertical Dial 497
A beautiful and well preserved vertical dial 40 x 40 inches. The sundial is on the southerly facing wall of Albany City Hall's 202 foot carillon tower, a building on the National Historic Register. The dial is marked with lines every 15 minutes; the hour lines are marked in roman numerals extending from XII in the morning to XII at night. Although the dial is in excellent condition, the gnomon is slightly bent. There is a small "signature" on the lower boarder of the brass plate, "Haight and Clark, Albany NY". Side note: The tower houses the first municipal carillon in the US (1927).
 
 
Columbia Missouri USA Cylindrical Dial 496
A cylindrical dial 10 inches in diameter constructed of photoengraved aluminum. The elegant dial plate shows each hour line as a full analemma and lines for Central Standard and Central Daylight Time. Accompanied by seasonal lines of solstice, equinox, monthly lines and other dates during the year. Back and base of dial are constructed of PVC.
 
 
Medicine Hat Alberta Canada Equatorial Dial 495
The Medicine Hat equatorial sundial was commissioned by the Rotary Club of Medicine Hat to commemorate its 50th anniversary (1918-1968). This is an Erickson equatorial polar dial. The dial is 6 feet 9 inches in diameter, made of pink granite, and weighs 3450 pounds. The dial is supported by an inclined stainless steel gnomon rod 3 inches in diameter, with overall length just over 6 feet. As with many of these dials, there are two equation of time plaques.
 
 
Traverse City Michigan USA Analemmatic Dial 494
This beautiful analemmatic dial was built as part of the American Society of Landscape Architects' 100 years/100 Parks project. A colored concrete pad was poured on the north/south axis and scored joints for each month. Stainless steel plates show the name of the months. On either side of the concrete pad are dry laid flagstones with creeping thyme in the joints. Hour markers are 12 inch diameter colored concrete bases with numbers cut from stainless steel. A stained glass sun plaque at the top of the month axis was made by a local artisan. Total dial size is about 10 x 20 feet.
 
 
Taos New Mexico USA Horizontal Dial 493
A copper and bronze horizontal dial about 15 x 15 inches. The dial was built by the Rocky Mountain Youth Corp, an organization the helps direct the energies of "at risk" youth. Base of dial is clad with 2x4 inch glazed tiles made by all the 5th graders in town. There is a compass rose around the base and on dedication day, an area of wet cement was available those present to make an inscription or hand print.
 
 
Hamilton Ontario Canada Vertical Dial 492
On the outside south wall of the library, about 15 feet above the ground is a vertical dial about one meter square. Dial is declined 18 deg 6 min west. The 1pm and 8pm numbers are missing. The dial is stone with aluminum gnomon and numbers.
 
 
Washington District of Columbia USA Analemma Dial 491
With a bit of whimsy at the end of each day for over two years, Dr. James Griffith marked the position of a ray of sunlight on a wall that entered from a west window overlooking the Potomac river. The result is an analemma, tracing the sun's position at 4:10 pm E.S.T. throughout the seasons. Dr. Griffith was a chemist, but as written on a plaque next to the analemma, "Exactly what this has to do with chemistry per se is not perfectly clear, but Viva Principia Scientifica!" Photos may be seen on Walt Sanford's web site.
 
 
Roswell New Mexico USA Horizontal Dial 490
A beautiful bronze sundial sits on a pillar of rough marble. It was given to the Library by the Roswell Womens Club at the turn of the 20th century. Unfortunately the dial is damaged, but the Roswell Womans Club is searching for someone to repair the dial.
 
 
Cuencame Durango Mexico Vertical Dial 489
This vertical dial is 2m tall by 1.2 m wide and sits atop a quarried column nearly 7 m high. The gnomon on each face is approximately 60 cm long, and 16-19 mm in diameter. Each face has Roman numerals to indicate apparent solar time from 6am to 6pm. Alpha and Omega Greek letters. A carved cross at the twelve hour line. Inscribed "1904"
 
 
Monterrey Nuevo Leon Mexico Equatorial Dial 488
This equatorial dial is just over 3 m in size, made of iron. Along the equatorial band are twelve Roman numerals to indicate apparent solar time and twelve Arabic numerals to indicate standard time. The outside of the equatorial band has zodiac constellations. There are also solstice and equinox discs at the gnomon. There is a plaque for the equation of time and an explanation of time corrections next to the sundial. The dial sits on a 1 m high stone base.
 
 
Torreon Coahuila Mexico Vertical Dial 487
This is a stone cube 3.5 m high with four vertical dials. Each dial face is about 2.2 m high by 1.25 m wide The South and North faces have Arabic numerals to indicate solar time from 6am to 18hrs, with marks every 15 minutes. The East face has numerals from 6am to 12pm and the West face complements from 12pm to 18hrs. These faces have half hour marks. The South face has seven declination lines, constellation dates, analemma line, zodiac symbols, and equinoctial and solstice lines. A curve to indicate light and shadow hours all the year is on each face. A square base on quarry. At the north-east corner are the carved names of the designer Miguel Bertran de Quintana and builder Cirilo Nunez. Note: because of the sundial size and latitude, it was necessary to extend the four vertical faces of the sundial into the horizontal plane to indicate the summer solstice line and 11:30 and noon hours of summer.
 
 
West Des Moines Iowa USA Armillary Dial 486
Stainless steel armillary sphere, approximately 8 foot in diameter. No numbers. Slits for hour lines.
 
 
West Des Moines Iowa USA Armillary Sphere Dial 485
Armillary sphere memorial, approximately 18 inches in diameter. Painted steel or bronze
 
 
Des Moines Iowa USA Horizontal Dial 484
Several horizontal dials. East dial is a small bronze dial, vandalized gnomon is missing; incorrect orientation. North dial is a 4 foot marble dial
 
 
Des Moines Iowa USA Horizontal Dial 483
A very large and striking horizontal dial 50 feet in diameter with a 15 foot tall metal gnomon. Hours are marked by bronze plaques and Roman numerals