Sundials - World's Oldest Clocks

North American Sundial Society

2002_McMath_SolarTelescopeThis conference had a historical bent:  Conferee speakers received a replica of the “Fugio” cent, America’s first coin issued in 1787.  The coin was designed by Benjamin Franklin and shows a sundial with the motto “Fugio” meaning “Time flies”.  Len Breggren discussed the history of sundials to 200 BCE and the work of the Greek geometer Diocles, who described the earliest Greek sundial, a hemispherical mirror that indicated the hour of the day from burning a trace.  Fred Sawyer continued the historical view, discussing the overlap of Dialing and Cartography.  Other presentations discussed the Prime Vertical and construction of daylines. Bill Walton presented “Pinholes and Shadow Sharpening” and Bill Gottesman presented a method for measuring wall declination using a carpenter’s square.  John Carmichael discussed how one might turn the McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope into a sundial; Saturday’s sundial tour started at the Kitt Peak National Observatory, home of the world’s largest collection of optical telescopes (in 2002).

Attachments:
Download this file (2002_NASSConference_Tuscon.pdf)2002_NASSConference_Tuscon.pdf[2002 NASS Conference Tuscon]1683 kB

2001_ParcRegionaldeLongueuilFaced with the turmoil of September 11th, many NASS members were unable to attend the conference. André Bochard began by giving description of sundials in the Stewart Museum collection, visited by the conferees the following day. Fred Sawyer described the beginning of the Shadow Catcher series, a set of digital reproductions of historical dialing books. Then, a number of interesting sundials were described, including the Sunmaster universal ring dial, an update on digital sundials, and a new type of horizontal dial from Fred Sawyer.  André Bochard gave the conferees information on the formation and operation of Commission des Cadrans Solaire de Québec, the society devoted to French Canadian sundialing.  Bill Gottesman spoke about his “Mathematical Expedition to the North Pole”, illustrating the concepts by juggling a bowling ball. The sundial tour included the Steward Museum and outdoor equatorials seen on a sunny day at the Parc régional de Longueuil and the marina de Boucherville.  See these dials and much more in the PDF download!

Attachments:
Download this file (2001_NASSConference_Montreal.pdf)2001 NASS Conference Montreal[NASS Annual Conference]9282 kB

2000_Sunstone_SanFranciscoRon Anthony, Carl Trost and Mark Gingrich organized the 2000 NASS conference in San Francisco.  A wide variety of sundial papers were presented, including Carl Trost’s description of the 1913 opening of the Ingleside Terrace sundial with a 28-foot gnomon, Robert Kellogg’s description of the “Amazing Maize Maze” the largest “organic” sundial, and educational insights by Mac Oglesby and Paul Lapp who reminded the conferees that “Toves don’t do Trig”.  Download the PDF to read about the other sundial talks and discover the Azimeter and Sawyer Equant dials are all about.   The sundial tour included a visit to the Heliodon at the Energy Center of Pacific Gas & Electric Company, and a tour through San Francisco and Berkely to see a number of dials including the Entrada Court horizontal dial at Ingleside Terracethe large horizontal dial at Hunter’s Ridge and the Navigator’s Sundial on the back of a tortoise in Golden Gate Park, and the Sunstone Alignment stones at the Park and at Lawrence Hall of Science in Berkeley.

Attachments:
Download this file (2000_NASSConference_SanFrancisco.pdf)2000 NASS Conference San Francisco[NASS Annual Conference]6559 kB

1999_LoomisChaffeeDial_WinsorThis year’s NASS conference was held in Hartford, CT with 50 attendees.  There were many presenters from sculptor and sundial designer Robert Adzema to Mike Shaw, one of four attendees from the UK.  There were many interesting dials on display, including Fritz Stumpges “Solar Flair” dial, Larry Bohlayer’s “Sun Vial, Bill Gottesman’s Spiral Sundial, Mac Oglesby’s shadow plane dial, Mayall’s Cube dial at CIGNA, Waugh’s pillar dial at University of Connecticut, and Judy Young’s “Sunwheel” stone alignment circle at University of Massachusetts in Amherst.  Tom Kreyche presented a paper describing his computer program to update and expand NASS’s Dialist’s Companion software while Sara Schechner discussed the interrelation of sundials, time and Christianity, drawing upon many European cathedrals that served as giant meridian sundials.  As with a number of previous conferences, it rained or was sunless for much of the Saturday sundial tour.

Attachments:
Download this file (1999_NASSConference_Hartford.pdf)1999 NASS Conference Hartford[NASS Annual Conference]957 kB

1998_UnivWash_Sullivan_SeattleThe attached PDF file begins “For the second year in a row, the Sun shone brightly on the annual NASS conference,” even though it was held at the University of Washington in Seattle.  A large number of sundial related displays, outdoor demonstrations, and a local tour of Seattle area sundials provided “hands-on” experience for the conferees.  Woody Sullivan, conference host, described the “hands-on” experience of designing and building the large vertical dial on the Physics and Science building.  Len Berggren presented history of gnomonics in medieval Islam, pointing out that the time of afternoon prayer is defined in terms of gnomon shadow length.  The Seattle tour of sundials included the analemmatic sundial in Gasworks Park, dials at Billings Middle School, and the Webster Park Equatorial Sundial among many others.  See what you missed, and download the PDF for all the details.

Attachments:
Download this file (1998_NASSConference_Seattle.pdf)1998 NASS Conference Seattle[NASS Annual Conference]2535 kB