Sundials - World's Oldest Clocks

North American Sundial Society

Sundials of North America

This is a complete listing of sundials in the North American Sundial Society Registry. Click on any dial thumbnail picture or city name to display our complete listing and images. To see sundials in a particular state or province, you may click on the list at left to see all registered sundials in that state, province or country (at bottom) displayed in city order.

 
 
Baltimore Maryland USA Horizontal Dial 324
A horizontal dial 36 inches in diameter, made of bronze, sitting on an irregular pentagonal block of granite. Gnomon missing. Calibrated to read local solar time, and has a graph of the Equation of Time to correct readings to standard time.
 
 
Baltimore Maryland USA Horizontal Dial 323
Nice horizontal dial sitting on a 6 x 4 foot stone pedestal. The dial itself is 5 foot in diameter with a 2.5 foot gnomon of open-work bronze. The lines, numerals and lettering of the dial face are so finely done that one cannot tell whether the dial plate was made of cast stone or was carved by an extraordinarily skilled mason. The gnomon, unfortunately, is situated incorrectly on the dial face. The point at which the stile diverges from the dial plate is about five inches south of the correct point where the hour lines converge.
 
 
Schenectady New York USA Sculpture Dial 322
Sundial in the shape of a Crouching Indian
 
 
Rehoboth Beach Delaware USA Horizontal Dial 321
A bronze horizontal dial about 18 inches in diameter. The sundial was designed by Col. W.S. Corkran in 1930 and placed in the Homestead House garden, a 3 1/2 acre site maintained by the Rehoboth Art League since 1938. Col. Corkran died in 1962. The sundial was restored in 1999, set atop a capstan from an old sailing ship. Since 1999 the salt air has continued to deteriorate the plaques and gnomon. The dial face is still quite readable, with Arabic hours from 6am to 6pm delineated in 5 minute intervals. Symbols of the zodiac decorate the dial in a circular arc.
 
 
Wilmington Delaware USA Vertical Dial 320
A round limestone vertical dial about 3 feet in diameter with bronze gnomon. Hours are bronze Roman numerals. No hour lines drawn. The dial is set on the side of a beautiful stone tower. According to a plaque at the tower's base, in 1895 Theodore Leissen recommended a large pavilion and observatory be built on the city's highest hill. At the same time the Water Commission needed a water tower. The plans were merged, resulting in a combine stone water tower 115 feet tall holding half a million gallons and a roofed observatory platform. The dial is on the side of this Rockford Tower.
 
 
Olympia Washington USA Horizontal Dial 319
John W. Elliot, a Seattle master craftsman designed and execute the Territorial Sundial. The 6 foot dial is hand-hammered in brass with a bronze rod gnomon. The dial plate has eight bas-relief panels depicting events in Washington State's history including the discoveries of Captain George Vancouver in 1792, the Medicine Creek Treaty between the US and Puget Sound Native Americans in 1854 and the first railroad to Puget Sound, built in 1883. The dial rests on a large slab of Wilkenson sandstone, the same material used in the nearby State Library, supported by four, one foot nine inch tall piers.
 
 
Galveston Texas USA Equatorial Dial 318
This is an equatorial dial 3 x 4 feet tall, set up for the latitude and longitude of Galveston Texas. Corrections for the Equation of Time are cut as an analemma into the broad gnomon that rotates on a polar rod. The Equatorial time ring has hour lines viewed as standard time or DST at 5 minute intervals. The dial started when one of the Galveston residents constructed a park to honor his grand father. Bill Swann proposed to put a dial in one corner. His friend liked the idea. The park architect wanted the dial to be long lasting and suggested that it be made of galvanized steel. The dial is made out of rolled flat bar with a cross section of 3/4 x 4 inches. The dial itself was patterned after a dial which was located at Swann's college campus- Vanderbilt University. That dial was designed by the late Professor Dillard Jacobs. While Swann did not remember the specifics of that dial, the memory of it set the quest to decipher the suns orbit for this Galveston sundial. The time is displayed from a shadow cast onto a time ring. The "operator" pivots a plate, facing it toward the sun. The inscription on the plate reads "Face bar towards sun-Read time at month's shadow". The plate has a cutout in the shape of the analemma. Where the shadow cast by this cutout falls on the time ring specifies the time. Swann remembers that he "stayed out quite late one night to align the dial to a point in the sky near the north star." The sundial design is identical to the design of dial # 344 on the NASS web page. The metal forming techniques are different. Swann has been in contact with the designer, Peter Swanstrom.
 
 
Sacramento Peak New Mexico USA Armillary Sphere Dial 317
The bronze armillary sphere is 5-foot in diameter. The dial reads time and date from a rod gnomon cast onto an engraved, equatorial band. The dial shows date bands and solar time corrected for longitude (3 min 17s west of the 105 degree meridian). The dial is accurate to about one minute. At the noon hour line is an analemma showing the correction to mean time. The armillary sphere was designed and built by observatory staff members Dr. Don Neidig, Scott Gregory, and Mitchell Davis.
 
 
Washington District of Columbia USA Horizontal Dial 316
A horizontal dial 26 inches in diameter with a 9 inch gnomon. Has hour and half hour lines from 5 am to 7pm with 10 minute marks. Made of chocolate sandstone. South of the gnomon is an engraving of two children walking under a tree. Designed by John Carmichael
 
 
Seattle Washington USA Equatorial Dial 315
An interesting equatorial dial 30 inches in diameter, made of bronze and terrazzo, sitting upon a tapered concrete pedestal cylinder that almost, but not quite, looks like a large flower pot. The dial plate is plainly decorated with a gnomon pole about 1.5 inches in diameter. Sitting at the north end of the pole is a very nice globe of the earth with continents in relief.
 
 
Park City Kentucky USA Horizontal Dial 314
A beautiful horizontal dial 25 inches in diameter with a 9 inch gnomon. Has hour and half hour lines from 5 am to 7pm with 10 minute marks. South of the gnomon is an intricately engraved Great Seal of The United States of America. The dial is of Coconino sandstone and sits on a brick surround.
 
 
Flagstaff Arizona USA Horizontal Dial 313
This cast iron horizontal dial is set in a 6 foot diameter limestone base 2 feet off the ground. The interior region of the dial face is a white tile mosaic. The gnomon has pictures of buffalo and a horned lizard done in relief. The edge of the dial is a cast iron ring, upon which are four cardinal points and hour markers from 5am to 7pm, likewise in cast iron. The dial is corrected to mountain standard time.
 
 
Worcester Massachusetts USA Equatorial Dial 312
A Victor E. Edwards bronze equatorial sundial. It has an unusual crescent shaped arm with notch at the upper end. The arm is rotated until sunlight through the notch strikes an analemma on the lower inner curve of the crescent. Time is then read on a circular dial from an "hour hand" pointer extending from the base of the crescent.
 
 
Brooklyn Michigan USA Horizontal Dial 311
A well-rusted horizontal dial of iron or steel about 10 inches diameter on a stone and masonry pedestal. Dial face shows Arabic hour numerals but hour line angles may be wrong. Mounted atop a stone and masonry pedestal.
 
 
Washington District of Columbia USA Dial 310
Bronze sundial on a concrete column.
 
 
Los Angeles California USA Sculpture Dial 309
A sundial sculpture by Martha Oathout Ayers. More information about this dial is needed.
 
 
Elmira New York USA Sculpture Dial 308
Plaster Sundial (sculpture)
 
 
Oakland California USA Sculpture Dial 307
Bronze sundial sculpture by Robert Paine. The sundial was donated to University High School in 1927 by Sara Bard Field in honor of her son Albert, who was killed in 1917 in an automobile accident. Albert was the high school senior class president in 1917. His mother Sara was a leading suffragist on the West Coast. The High School has been renovated and now used by Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute (CHORI). The sculpture is of a boy holding a shield and an arrow. The arrow casts a graceful shadow onto the level shield. The sculpture is about 30 inches high. The base is stone, probably a jade.
 
 
Seattle Washington USA Sculpture Dial 306
3x9x4 feet Bronze Gnomon (sculpture)
 
 
Indianapolis Indiana USA Sculpture Dial 305
Bronze Sundial, Boy with Spider Gnomon wire is broken but present as of 2/2014.