Sundials - World's Oldest Clocks

North American Sundial Society

Sundials of North America

This is a complete listing of sundials in the North American Sundial Society Registry. Click on any dial thumbnail picture or city name to display our complete listing and images. To see sundials in a particular state or province, you may click on the list at left to see all registered sundials in that state, province or country (at bottom) displayed in city order.

 
 
Sudbury Ontario Canada Terra Globe Dial 359
A monumental dial in stainless steel. At one end of 'Polaris Boulevard' which includes Terra, a segment of the globe oriented with Sudbury directly at the top. Celeste is a giant (12.8 meter or 42-foot) stainless steel sundial located at the south end of Polaris Boulevard. It consists of two arches, one which represents the equator in the sky, and one which represents the meridian, or the line from the North Pole to South Pole. A large steel pipe makes up the gnomon of the sundial.
 
 
Burmingham Pennsylvania USA Armillary Dial 358
An armillary dial in poor shape.
 
 
Columbus Ohio USA Sculpture Dial 357
"Hora Novem" An unusual 'solar calendar water sculpture' incorporating water jets which converge at center of a 17ft equatorial ring.
 
 
Durham North Carolina USA Sculpture Dial 356
"Gnomon", a large sculpture consisting of two monoliths made of steel-reinforced concrete slabs. Includes a noon indication.
 
 
Flemington New Jersey USA Horizontal Dial 355
Horizontal dial with an intricately hand cut stainless steel gnomon with a cast bronze dial face. The shadow casting style is the lower edge of the large gnomon. A second short gnomon indicates solstice and equinox dates. Dial sits atop a 700 lb stone pedestal base.
 
 
St. Louis Missouri USA Horizontal Dial 354
A horizontal dial sculpture called "Child Sundial" depicts a daydreaming child figure playing with a sundial gnomon that is part of a working sundial. The gnomon is about 5 1/2 inches high and the hour lines are adjusted to show standard time in St. Louis. The sculpture and dial are at ground level surrounded by a bed of creeping thyme, perhaps a gentle Herb garden pun. Statue constructed of lead, 12 x 21 inches
 
 
Augusta Georgia USA Analemmatic Dial 353
An analemmatic dial in brick and stone.
 
 
Little Rock Arkansas USA Horizontal Dial 352
The Arkansas Sesquicentennial Sundial. Monumental horizontal dial in a 40 ft square patio made of stones from significant sites of the world. The gnomon is 17 feet high by 21.5 ft. long. The sundial won First Place in the International Bricklayers & Allied Craftsmens Union - presented every 5 years. It featured an outer adornment of brick contributed from over 70 nations. SUNDIAL WAS DESTROYED and no longer exists - Apr 2002
 
 
Enid Oklahoma USA Equatorial Dial 351
A striking stainless steel equatorial dial 6 ft tall, 4 ft wide, and 6 ft deep. The equatorial ring is more than 2 ft wide. The dial can be used as a simple equatorial dial, reading the hour from a shadow cast by the steel wire gnomon aligned to the polar axis. However a bead nodus located in the middle of the wire casts its shadow onto the equatorial ring as well. An analemma on an arched plate is set to slide along the equatorial ring in a track. By sliding the plate to a position where the nodus shadow falls on the analemma for the day of year, the dial corrects for the Eot. Markers on the analemma plate point to the correct time at the edge of the ring. The top of the ring is inscribed for Central Standard Time and the bottom is inscribed for Central Daylight Time. Overall, the sundial is accurate to about a minute any day of the year. The analemma was computed by Lt Col Bill Welker, USAF and the dial was funded by McCasland Foundation.
 
 
Banica Dominican Republic Pillar Dial 350
A small pillar dial with a vertical dial on one face. The dial markings sit below a triangular crown inscribed with the date MDCCVC, showing 1795 as the year it was carved. Today, the bottom portion of the pillar appears to be reconstructed and the gnomon is missing.
 
 
San Juan Puerto Rico USA Vertical Dial 349
A round pillar supports a rock cube with vertical dials on all four faces. This is one of the oldest in the Americas, erected by the Spanish around 1645 during the rule of Fernando de la Riva y Aguero. The vertical dial cube was crowned with a weather vane on top. This sundial was the first to be installed in the Antilles and was probably the second sundial to be placed in the New World.
 
 
Santo Domingo Dominican Republic Pillar Dial 348
At the upper end of a tapering pillar is a rock cube with vertical dials on two faces. The dial was erected during the administration of Francisco Rubio y Pernaranda around 1753 in front of the Governor's Palace and was used during the centuries of Spanish rule as the official marker of time. An equatorial dial was placed on top of the cube probably around 1787 and was later broken off by a hurricane. In 1992, as part of the Fifth Centennial Discovery activities, the equatorial dial was reinstalled on top. Dial sits atop a mortar or rock block.
 
 
Salt Lake City Utah USA Azimuth Dial 347
A 24 foot tall azimuth dial in a complex sculpture comprising a light projection gnomon within a 36 foot diameter base with numerous additional shadow-casting structures. The "Asteroid Landed Softly" sundial sculpture was created in 1993 by architect Kazuo Matsubayashi. The sculpture symbolizes the concepts of space and time: space as a large boulder (asteroid) sitting on a square pedestal; and, time as an azimuth sundial that shows the path of the sun through the day and seasons.
 
 
Ypsilanti Michigan USA Horizontal Dial 346
The original horizontal dial and gnomon of 1909 was cast aluminum, very rare for a turn of the century dial, and have been assigned a safe place in history in the EMU archives. The new sundial face is weathered brass and copper. The sundial is being replaced on campus after a 30 year absence and recent rediscovery. The granite face of the sundial plinth under the metal base has directional lines indicating major cities in Michigan, Ohio, and around the United States. The original 1908 granite pedestal about 4 ft. high is still used.
 
 
Greenwich Connecticut USA Horizontal Dial 345
Large horizontal dial is 130 ft. diameter and uses 15 hour stones to mark the time. Dial designed by Shope Reno Wharton Associates and built by sculptor Mark Mennin of Bethlehem, CT. The striking gnomon is a bronze tapered spike 8 in. at the base and 35 ft. 2 in. in overall length set in a 4 ft. bronze web, producing a 20 ft. high tip above the average grade. The noon stone is a flat marble slab 5 ft x 8 ft with a center score line. The 14 other hour stones are sculpted marble, each about 3 ft x 5 ft, abstractly depicting the progress of mankind's social progress across time. Only the first and last stone are marked with a time arrow. On the ground are two marble cubes with didactic bronze plates. Dial is adjacent to a pair of bronzed driftwood horse sculptures (full size). Dial site will be the first stop on the Bruce Museum school tour route. Gift from the Millennium Committee to the city of Greenwich
 
 
Boise Idaho USA Equatorial Dial 344
Equatorial dial 5 ft high, 6 ft. wide and 4 ft. deep. The dial was designed by Pete Swanstrom, built and donated by JST Custom Fabrication Inc. of Boise. The gnomon is of unusual design with a central pivoting elliptical plate and analemmatic cut out. The analemma is marked with 365 individual date marks. Shadow falls on equatorial ring with hours marked from 7am to 7pm and inscribed with lines for every minute (spaced 1/7 inch apart). Indicates time to less than 15 seconds, making it among the most accurate sundials in the world. Indicates true time to the minute, date to the day, and adjusts for Daylight saving time. The Latin inscription should read "Tempus Captum" rather than "Tempus Captus".
 
 
Halifax Nova Scotia Canada Armillary Sphere Dial 343
This armillary sphere, made of steel and brass, is approximately 2 meters tall. The dial is the result of a collaboration between students from the 1997 Industrial Engineering class of the Technical University of Nova Scotia (now called DAL TECH) and a local shipbuilding firm who did the construction. The theme of industrial engineering is reflected in the cogwheel-like metal rings used in the construction. Initials of every classmate are punched into the cogs. On the plinth is the Equation of Time.
 
 
Plymouth Massachusetts USA Horizontal Dial 342
approx. 8 feet in diameter Roman numerals, with half-hour marks and compass rose. Dial sits on a rectangular stone pedestal.
 
 
Hamilton Ontario Canada Analemmatic Dial 341
Construction of the dial and garden was supported by the Richard and Jean Ivey Fund of London, Ontario. An analemmatic dial about 25 feet wide with stone markers and metal numbers.
 
 
Honolulu Hawaii USA Equatorial Dial 340
As of May 2012, this dial was removed from display by museum staff. Bronze equatorial dial 20, inches in diameter. The dial is outlined by an ornate ring tilted in the plane of the polar axis with extending flames representing the sun. A gnomon rod bisects this ring. The dial base is a statue of the Hawaiian mythological figure Maui snaring the sun, Kala, with ropes to snare the sun. The dial itself is a semicircular portion of an equatorial ring with inscribed hour lines and raised Roman numerals. The dial has been exhibited in various museums in San Diego, San Francisco, Seattle and Vancouver before permanent installation at the Bishop Museum in Honolulu. Gnomon and equatorial ring appear misaligned for 21 degree latitude. The museum is will correct the dial in the near future.