Sundials - World's Oldest Clocks

North American Sundial Society

Sundials of North America

This is a complete listing of sundials in the North American Sundial Society Registry. Click on any dial thumbnail picture or city name to display our complete listing and images. To see sundials in a particular state or province, you may click on the list at left to see all registered sundials in that state, province or country (at bottom) displayed in city order.

 
 
Renton Washington USA Horizontal Dial 524
A 44 x 60 foot horizontal dial with 20 foot tall stainless steel gnomon. This may be the largest horizontal dial in the state of Washington. Five colors of concrete define distinct parts of the dial and pathways (the 8 o?clock and 5 o?clock hour lines are walkways between buildings). Other hour lines have concrete benches and stainless steel discs to mark each hour, plus inlaid bronze discs for daylight saving time. Hour lines have inset disks to indicate the hour, one disk for each counted hour 6 AM to 7 PM. The mid-day N-S hour line features thirteen hour disks; the previous hour has 12 disks and the next hour is marked with two disks. The N-S hour line may include one disk that is also a light to illuminate the gnomon at night.
 
 
Amherst Massachusetts USA Stonehenge Dial 523
On the fields of U-Mass is a replica of an American Indian sun-wheel. A circle 130 feet in diameter has 14 major stones weighing 56 tons, 12 minor stones, and 4 flat stones at the center. 2 major stones mark the N and S cardinal points; a pair of portal stones mark the E and W points allowing an uninterrupted view of sunrise and sunset at the equinoxes; 4 stones mark sunrise and sunset at the solstices; and 4 more stones mark the extreme northern and southern positions of moonrise and moonset. Guided presentations can be arranged by calling 413-545-4311.
 
 
Sebastopol California USA Globe Dial 522
The sundial is a cement globe of the earth 28 inches in diameter inclined at 40 degrees, a bit off the site's 38' 20" N latitude. The globe is oriented with the site longitude on the upper meridian so that shadows across the globe represent the true sun angle at that moment. A rod through the globe casts a shadow onto the north polar regions in the summer. At the southern end is a small equatorial dial with hour lines from 8am to 4pm.
 
 
Graylake Illinois USA Stonehenge Dial 521
"Sun Pivot" is a set of vertical "gatestones" that allow the viewing of two major solar alignments: The summer sunrise stone is set about 33 degrees north of east while the equinox stone is set due east. The angular cuts in the gatestones allows the framing of the sunrise event above the stones, which are set about 200 feet away in a field of prairie grass.
 
 
Berryville Virginia USA Horizontal Dial 520
This lovely horizontal dial was originally located in New York City NY on the grounds of the Doubleday & Co. book manufacturing plant. It was subsequently moved to Berryville VA in 1956, and is now part of Berryville Graphics. The sundial stands about 4 feet high and has a brass reproduction of the Gutenberg Bible of Forty Two Lines (originally produced around 1455) and the hour markers are brass plates of twelve printers' marks from the earliest printers.
 
 
Farrell Pennsylvania USA Sculpture Dial 519
"Rising Rings" is a cast iron band 11 feet high by 17 feet in diameter with a hole that casts a beam of light onto a central ring monument on the equinoxes. The dial was commissioned by Dr. Swraj Paul, a steel mill owner, to honor his daughter Ambika who died in 1968 of leukemia at age four. This monument honors the inspiration her joy of life instilled in her father. At the central of the dial is a cast iron ring that holds a bronze image of her that is illuminated for several days twice a year. On two dates, Ambika's birthday and the anniversary of the mill's re-opening the noon sunlight passes through the circular opening in the larger ring and strikes markers on the inner ring. Miklos Simon created the portrait of Ambika mounted on the smaller ring.
 
 
Redding California USA Horizontal Dial 518
When is a bridge not a bridge? When it's almost a sundial. The 217 foot high suspension span called Sundial Bridge wants to be a sundial, and has come very close. The suspension pylon is aligned true north, but unfortunately performs as an inaccurate gnomon with an inclination of 49 deg (for bridge functionality) rather than for the 40.6 deg latitude of the site. The bridge is 700 feet long and weighs 1,600 tons. Funding for the bridge comes from the McConnell Foundation, Redding Redevelopment Agency, Federal Highway Administration, and Turtle Bay Exploration Park
 
 
Watkins Glen New York USA Horizontal Dial 517
A simple horizontal dial made of slate with a copper gnomon. Hour lines are brass rods artfully arranged from 6am to 6pm. The hour lines are corrected for longitude.
 
 
Montour Falls New York USA Horizontal Dial 516
A beautiful bronze dial approximately 12 inches long in the shape of a shield. Below the gnomon is a rising sun. On first look, the small dial plate appears backward, with AM and PM hours reversed. However, the inclination of the gnomon is about 48 degrees, suggesting that this pedestal mounted dial is really meant to be a south facing vertical dial! The dial sits atop a circular granite pedestal about 2.5 feet in diameter.
 
 
Winter Park Florida USA Horizontal Dial 515
A 12-inch diameter horizontal bronze dial set on a simple fluted pedestal. The dial face includes hour lines with half hour and ten minute marks and a central compass rose. The gnomon includes an adjusting screw allowing the gnomon angle to be set to the latitude angle. The dial is located in a small garden area of an elementary school and includes a nearby flagstone bench. The walkway around the dial is of red bricks inscribed with the names of graduating students. Students learned of the death of a 9 year old classmate and through their fundraising efforts helped establish this memorial dial in their schoolyard. A visitor's pass is required from the administration office before viewing.
 
 
Brighton Colorado USA Equatorial Dial 514
This equatorial dial is one of the more distinctive Erikson Monument dials. It is octagonal about 4 feet across, made of white granite. It has a supporting stainless steel rod as gnomon. Hours from 4am to 8pm with 15 minute divisions. The hours are not rotated for longitude, placing the 12pm hour directly at nadir. Below the sundial is a plaque containing a graph of the equation of time.
 
 
Nantucket Massachusetts USA Horizontal and Gnomonic Dial 513
A combination of horizontal dial and gnomonic projection dial. The dial is about 2 x 3 feet made of DuPont Corian sitting upon a simple wood pedestal. A small horizontal dial about 8 inches in diameter with a triangular brass gnomon tells Daylight Saving Time using Roman numerals. Then a larger gnomonic dial is inscribed on the remaining surface, telling time from the shadow of the tip of the triangular gnomon. The gnomonic dial has hourly analemmas,telling time using Arabic numbers in Standard Time. Both dial lines are offset for the longitude of 70 degrees west. The gnomonic dial has declination lines for each month. A small analemma on the meridian has the letters of the months, indicating how to read the hourly analemmas depending upon the date. The dial is built to be read from the north, so the user's shadow does not interfere.
 
 
Waukesha Wisconsin USA Horizontal Dial 512
A large horizontal dial in a circular plaza made of tan concrete and red brick. The concrete gnomon stands about 16 feet tall. No hour lines are drawn on the plaza, but the hours are set in a circular ring at the edge of the plaza.
 
 
Littleton Colorado USA Equatorial Dial 511
The Littleton War sundial is an Erickson equatorial polar dial 6 feet in diameter made of light granite with a 3 inch steel rod as gnomon. Time is graduated by hour, half-hour, quarter hours and 5 minute marks over 24 hours. Noon is at the bottom, matching the 105 degree meridian. Designed to be read from the upper surface in Spring/Summer, from the under side in Fall/Winter. A plaque provides the Equation of Time to convert solar time to watch time. Dial is in a beautiful setting.
 
 
Englewood Colorado USA Equatorial Dial 510
The Archie Lynn Chase Sundial is an equatorial polar dial. Unlike other monumental polar dials (designed by Erickson Monument Co), the dial face is more of a rounded square than a circular disk. Hours, half hours, quarter hours and five minute lines mark the time from 4am to 8pm. The hour lines are rotated for the site latitude. A steel gnomon rod about 3 inches in diameter casts the shadow. Has a plaque describing the Equation of Time.
 
 
Torre Coahuila Mexico Analemmatic Dial 509
An analemmatic dial with major axis of 18 feet built of many different types of stone from the Torre?n Jard?n area, including white and red marble, travertine, yellow and black flagstone, and limestone. Insets of gray stone hold the hour markers from 5am to 7pm. The finished dial has been set in desert plants, native to the region, including: Candelilla, Gobernadora, Lechuguilla, Sangre de drago, Huevo de toro, Biznaga, Pitaya, Corona de espinas, Nopal rastrero, and Cardenche. These are all protected desert species. The dial has a compass rose and six disk-shaped maps at the east and west sides to show the course of sunrise/sunset across the Mexican Republic on the solstices and equinox.
 
 
Lafayette Louisiana USA Analemmatic Dial 508
An analemmatic dial about 15 x 20 feet of concrete raised slightly above the surrounding school yard. Edged in brick. The center line is brick inset with dates to each side. The hours are marked for both Central and Daylight time. Large cardinal points are at the edge of the dial. The dial is rugged yet fits with the modern design of the school.
 
 
Toms River New Jersey USA Horizontal Dial 507
A horizontal dial about 22 feet in diameter. The dial base is stone and gravel outlined in shore juniper plants. Treated lumber, now gray through weathering, is used for the both the hour lines and the marking Roman numeral hours. Nicely fashioned with a hub of green junipers in the center surrounding a simple wood gnomon. Builder Richard Perez started off just wanting something a little different?and the sundial emerged in 1992 as the main theme of landscaping.
 
 
Burlington Vermont USA Analemmatic Dial 506
A small table top analemmatic dial 31 x 23 inches, made of Rock Sandstone & gold-plated brass. Has sunrise and sunset seasonal markers. Date line divided into weeks.
 
 
Claremont California USA Equatorial Dial 505
A 90 inch diameter spherical segment equatorial dial ten feet high of masonry construction with 3D fiberglass analemmic gnomon 40 inches long. Dial terrazzo face has hour, half-hour, quarter-hour and 5-minute marks with Roman hour numerals for PST. The 5-minute marks are one inch apart. Dial face includes analemma graphic with month dates; a plaque describes how to use the analemma graphic to select which side of the gnomon shadow to use to read time. Base perimeter has 12 ceramic plaques with Zodiacal signs. Indicated time is accurate to one minute throughout the winter and to five minutes in summer. This is remarkable because the dial is located just outside a children's playground and children routinely climb on the dial and swing from the gnomon. An animation from digital images showing the gnomon shadow motion over the course of a full year is available. Dedicated as the Ralph B. Larkin Memorial Sundial. Rev. Larkin was a retired missionary who taught science to children for 17 years in Claremont. Dr. Larkin's father was Edgar Lucien Larkin, Director of the Mt. Lowe Observatory above Los Angeles 1900-1924 using a 16-inch Alvan Clark refractor telescope, described by Alvan Clark as, "the finest telescope I ever made." Ralph Larkin often said, "I grew up with a telescope." The Mt. Lowe Observatory was destroyed in a windstorm in 1928 and the Alvan Clark refractor was moved to Ricard Observatory at the University of Santa Clara, California.