Sundials - World's Oldest Clocks

North American Sundial Society

Sundials of North America

This is a complete listing of sundials in the North American Sundial Society Registry. Click on any dial thumbnail picture or city name to display our complete listing and images. To see sundials in a particular state or province, you may click on the list at left to see all registered sundials in that state, province or country (at bottom) displayed in city order.

 
 
Watertown Connecticut USA Vertical Dial 32
Norman Bliss, who reported this dial, taught astronomy at Taft School for many years. He challenged students to find this abstract dial. The dial no longer exists and was destroyed when the building was demolished.
 
 
Stamford Connecticut USA Vertical Dial 31
Vertical dial designed by R. Newton Mayall. Sailing ship in background. Longitude, latitude and declination given on face. Built in 1954.
 
 
New Haven Connecticut USA Vertical Dial 30
Vertical dial on Sterling Library. Rectangular stone with hour lines and Arabic numbers. Gnomon is a plain rod emanating from a sunburst. Stonework shows it to be built into the wall of the library.
 
 
Mystic Connecticut USA Armillary Dial 29
This armillary dial with a sailing ship weather vane is on the cover photo of Albert Waugh's book "Sundials - Their Theory and Construction" (paperback edition). The dial sits atop a short stone platform outside of the Treworgy Planetarium, on the grounds of the Mystic Seaport Museum in Mystic, CT. To correct solar time to clock time, the dial has an Equation of Time table at the base. The armillary sphere underwent a restoration in the summer of 2015, removing corrosion, repainting the dial structure and equatorial band, and re-stencilling the longitude degree markings.
 
 
Hartford Connecticut USA Equatorial Dial 28
A bronze equatorial dial presented to the college as a gift from the class of 1889. For its age, it is in remarkably good condition. The 3 foot wide by 2 foot tall half cylinder is engraved with both hour and declination lines. At the noon-equinox point of the dial face a perpendicular pole rises to the centerline of the cylinder and supports a N-S gnomon rod. Unfortunately the southern portion of the rod is missing. The base is a square, tapered pillar.
 
 
Hartford Connecticut USA Pillar Polyhedral Dial 27
This is an 18th century polyhedral dial (dodecahedron). The dial was originally located at The Abbey, Storrington, Sussex, England. Carved stone with ten dials on a dodecahedral, some sunken, some planar. Pillar is about 12 ft. high.
 
 
Cincinnati Ohio USA Equatorial Dial 26
The sun-clock was based on an illustration that appeared in Scientific American, with dimensions and shape of analemma calculated from data found in an almanac. An equatorial ring, with inside dimension of 16' and engraved with an hour circle, is fastened orthogonally to a meridional ring and the assembly is rotated on a polar axis until a lens focuses the image of the sun on the analemma line. Knowing the season, the month and approximate day can be read from the analemma scale and standard time to the nearest minute. from the hour circle. Dial is operable, but bearings are in need of repair. A duplicate of the 1986 sun-clock is believed to be located on the former Kroger estate in suburban Cincinnati. The dial sits atop a brick platform with capstone
 
 
Bloomfield Connecticut USA Vertical Dial 25
Vertical dial on an eight ton granite cube, 4 foot on a side. Three vertical dials on east, south and west sides. Gnomons are missing Designed by R. Newton Mayall. A similar CIGNA cube dial is in Los Angeles, Union Square. Both dials owned by CIGNA Insurance Co.
 
 
Denver Colorado USA Equatorial Dial 24
Large Erickson equatorial monument dial. It consists of a disc of pink granite about 6 feet in diameter and 6 inches thick, tilted on edge to align with the earth's equator. The gnomon is an approximately 3 inches in diameter, made of a stainless steel rod piercing the disc at 90 degrees. It supports the disc from below, and protrudes about 2-3 feet above the disc; far enough that it casts a shadow on the face of the disc all summer. Winter shadows fall on the back side of the dial, also engraved with hour lines. The original sundial was erected in 1941. Dean Babcock was associated with the late Stephen A. Ionides of Erickson Monument Co. in designing and setting various sundials in Colorado, including this one. When George Cranmer undertook to place a dial of Chinese tradition in Cranmer park, Dean helped Ionides to translate the Chinese characters into Arabic. The stone cutter was probably John Earl Hershberger. The dial was replaced with the current one March 21, 1966 after the original was dynamited by vandals. The sandstone of the sundial base came from Lyons, Colorado. It is 5'5" thick and extends two feet below the pavement. In his inimitable style, Cranmer wrote in 1950 that "the sundial is only seventeen seconds of time East of the 105th Meridian on which Mountain Time is based, and since the whole setting is so accurate, one can set his watch by it." Erickson Monument, makers of the original sundial, created the award replica.
 
 
Tempe Arizona USA Horizontal Dial 23
A horizontal dial from Picture Rock Sandstone with 24k gold-plated inlaid brass fittings, 25 inches wide by 36 inches long, with gnomon 12.5 inches high. Gnomon is 1.5 inches thick. Total sundial weight 110 lbs. Time is marked in 10 minute intervals. Has Equation of Time and moonlight reading time correction table. Has the time and direction of sunrises and sunsets, the solstices, equinoxes, solar azimuth, and high noon.
 
 
Arvada Colorado USA Horizontal Dial 22
A large horizontal dial of brick and stone with a formed structural steel gnomon in the form of a modern sculpture. Roman numeral hour marks doe DST are on raised brick pillars.
 
 
Colma California USA Horizontal Dial 21
This large ground-level horizontal dial is 50 ft. diameter. Formerly a floral dial with a cypress tree as gnomon and hour lines crafted out of plants such as santilina shrubs, during the 1960's the dial was changed to concrete and aluminum.
 
 
San Francisco California USA Vertical Recliner Dial 20
Known as the "Navigators' Dial", this sundial is dedicated to three early explorers of the California coast. The dial itself is a sliced bronze globe of the earth sitting on the back of a tortoise. Overall, the globe hemisphere is about 2 1/2 feet in diameter, showing the world in relief centered on California. The flat face of the hemisphere is a beautiful vertical reclining dial. The dial sits atop a stone column. DIAL HAS BEEN REMOVED during remodeling of the De Young art museum - Apr 2002
 
 
San Diego California USA Vertical Dial 19
Above the southwest entrance of the Chemistry-Geology Building is a vertical declining dial built by Richard L. Threet in 1979. The dial uses thin aluminum tubing as a gnomon to cast shadows on a ring of hour and half hour lines approximately 9 feet in diameter. The lines were originally painted black on the white concrete wall with only the 9 am, 12 noon, 3 pm and 6 pm lines boldly numbered. Since then the dial has lost all but the 12. DIAL DESTROYED BY BUILDING REMODELING Per Richard Threet 12/2/2006
 
 
Riverside California USA Equatorial Dial 18
An equatorial dial 47 inches in diameter made of stainless steel. It sits upon four sleek pillars setting on a concrete rise. The gnomon rod has a round disk with a hole to act as a nodus. The dial equatorial band has solstice and equinox lines, as well as a line showing the declination of the sun marked with by months and zodiac signs. Hour lines are marked by raised stainless steel Roman Numerals. Dial is corrected to Pacific Standard Time.
 
 
Los Angeles California USA Vertical Dial 17
A vertical dial on a large granite cube. Similar to the one in Bloomfield CT. Both dials were made for CIGNA Insurance Co.
 
 
Berkeley California USA Horizontal Dial 16
A 16 inch diameter horizontal dial made of bronze. Gnomon is 8 in. long, 5 in. high. A classic horizontal dial on a 4 foot marble pedestal. Donated in 1915 by Class of 1877. Includes EOT table by date. The dial sits atop a marble pedestal.
 
 
Tucson Arizona USA Horizontal Dial 14
A 25 inch circular engraved horizontal dial in a large irregular stone. Surrounding the dial on the stone are zodiacal signs and a beautiful engraved drawing of the surrounding mountains. The designer, John Carmichael, calls these dials "horizontal string heliochronometers" since the gnomon is a brass cable held very straight under tension from a heavy counterweight which is suspended from a brass hinged lever.
 
 
Tucson Arizona USA Horizontal Dial 12
This concrete and adobe brick horizontal dial is approximately 8 1/2 feet in diameter with a triangular gnomon 25 x 32 inches. This is a large, but very plain sundial except for the shiny chrome plated gnomon. It lacks numerals, but has hour points and shows the cardinal points. The dial is corrected for longitude. The pedestal is missing some bricks and is adorned with graffiti.
 
 
Tucson Arizona USA Sun Circle Dial 11
A "Stonehenge" or sun circle dial designed by Chris Tanz, Susan Holman, Paul Edwards and with the help of Will Grundy and sponsored by the Pima County Flood Control and Transportation Dept. The structure uses a broken circle of walls to create designs made of light based on the movement of the sun. The circle, 50 feet in diameter with 8 foot walls is modeled loosely on the Casa Rinconada kiva ruins in Chaco Canyon, N.M. The walls are of integrally colored concrete block, concrete, and flagstone. Lines on a bronze plaque indicate north and south and the direction of sunrise and sunset on the equinoxes and solstices. Holes in the wall do the same. Solar noon is marked when sunlight comes through a slot in the South wall and passes a line on the floor.