Sundials - World's Oldest Clocks

North American Sundial Society

2008_OttomanDial_StLouisDon Snyder was a superb host for the St. Louis conference.  He organized an interesting tour that included the Jefferson Barracks 1817 sundial (now part of the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency), the angel holding a vertical sundial on the wall of the St. Louis University Hospital, and the several dials at the Jewel Box in Forest Park.  At the Missouri History Museum, conferees saw the “Forgotten Sundial” designed by Thomas Jefferson.  At Danforth Campus of Washington University  was the 1908 Cupples Dial, and finally at the Missouri Botanical Gardens two dials were dedicated: Ron Rhinehart’s cross-gnomon equatorial and Roger Bailey’s “Ottoman Garden”  sundial, based on Ibn Al-Shatir’s dial carved at the Great Mosque in Damascus in 1371.  At the conference, the major talk was on the Cahokia Woodhenge, presented by Michael Friedlander, professor of physics and astronomy at Washington University.”  And of course there were NASS speakers in abundance talking of dials, dialing scales, and new approaches to the Equation of Time.

Attachments:
Download this file (2008_NASSConference_St_Louis.pdf)2008 NASS Conference St. Louis[NASS Annual Conference]1038 kB

2007_OglesbyRopeandSparDialIn McLean, Virginia close to Washington, D.C. NASS held its 13th annual conference.  At the Analemma Society’s site in Observatory Park, Tony Moss’ dial, the “Jamestown Commemorative Dial,” was dedicated in front of over 50 school children and twice as many adults. This is the first sundial installation in what is planned to be an International Sundial Garden.  Other highlights of the sundial tour included the Lyman Briggs Memorial Dial at the National Institute of Science and Technology, the Latitude Observatory (once used to study the daily variation in the earth’s wobble and rotation rate), the Vernon Walker Education Center dial, and the vertical dial on the wall of Jack and Kate Aubert.  The conference talks included Roger Bailey on “God’s Longitude and the Lost Colony,” Woody Sullivan’s “Ten Tons of Basalt and Tenths of Degrees,”  Fred Sawyer’s discussion on the 17th century battle over the priority of inventing the stereographic quadrant dial, Kevin Karney’s “Variability in the Equation of Time” over geological epoch periods (well, for at least 500 years), and much more.  Most impressive was Julian Chen’s “Omnidirectional Lens in Sundials and Solar Compasses” using spheres filled with solution of copper sulfate to focus the sunlight onto a dial.

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Download this file (2007_NASSConference_McLean_VA.pdf)2007 NASS Conference McLean[NASS Annual Conference]1047 kB

2006_AlbinsonSlpitAnalemmaticArt meets science: John Carmichael held a workshop on DeltaCAD, a flexible computer aided design program for designing sundials and later in the conference with “Some New Sundials I” showed the result of such designs in beautiful stain glass sundials. From the history domain, Fred Sawyer told the story of Captain Sturmy, a 17th century mariner and author of “Gnomonical Scales,” now part of the Shadow Catchers series.  Len Berggren discussed the sundials of Geminos of Rhodes in his text “Introduction to the Phenomena,” written about the first century BCE.  Chuck Nafziger showed his light concentration sundial with Braille markings to show time-telling to the vision impaired, and Professor Woody Sullivan displayed a prototype of the One-World-Two-Suns Mars sundial. On the pavement of the parking lot, Brian Albinson drew out the split-analemma analemmatic sundial.  See these sundials and more … download the PDF.

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Download this file (2006_NASSConference_Vancouver.pdf)2006_NASSConference_Vancouver.pdf[2006 NASS Conference Vancouver]826 kB

2005_DuPageCountyMemorialSundialThis conference contrasted the old and the new.  Steve Luecking presented “Rope Geometry”, an outdoor exercise to draw an ellipse on the ground and draw a horizontal dial using only a knotted cord and stakes in the fashion of ancient Egyptian “rope pullers” (civil engineers).  When the conferees visited the Museum of Science and Industry, they were able to see a collection of dials, including a fine example of a first century AD dial, a slight variant of a hemisphaerium.  Klau Eichholz talked about Fr. Franz Xaver Josef Bovius and the restoration of his 1716 dial at Solnhofen.  On the modern fron, Mike Shaw led the group carefully through the steps of understanding and creating the ingenious Universal Diallist’s Companion.  By special arrangement, Fred Sawyer distributed copies of this very useful device to everyone in attendance.  Fred then introduced another new dial of his devising, the Hectemoros Dial.  Tony Moss discussed two power point presentations “Using and Understanding Sundials” and “Concepts for Students of Sundialling”.  A highlight of the conference was the announcement that the North American Sundial Society had been asked to be technical advisor on sun shadows for an episode of the television series “NUMB3RS.”  Plus many other presentations by Larry McDavid, Don Petrie, Roger Bailey and a workshop on 3D CAD by SteveLuecking.

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Download this file (2005_NASSConference_Chicago.pdf)2005 NASS Conference Chicago[NASS Annual Conference]676 kB

2004_GottesmanDialAt Tenafly, New Jersey NASS conferees once again to discuss sundials and sundial making.  Larry McDavid began the conference with “Sundials: Prehistory to the Digital Age” intended as an instructional power point that can be given to a wide spectrum of adult audiences.  A companion presentation, “Beauty in Dialing” is also released for educational use.  Bob Kellogg discussed construction and alignment of the Freedom High School 9-11 memorial Dial.  Bob Terwilliger “in a blaze of entertaining wizardry” described Bion’s 17th and 18th century techniques for dial construction usin his laser trigon “sciatorium.”  Bob showed how his precision instrument that can “draw a sundial on a Buick” also can design a dial on his garden hot-tub.  Steve Luecking demonstrated programs for deriving hour lines and day lines from shadow planes and other CAD techniques.  Plus many more interesting presentations by Bill Gottesman, Robert Adzema, Martin Jenkins, John Carmaichael, and Sara Schechner.

 

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Download this file (2004_NASSConference_Tenafly.pdf)2004 NASS Conference Tenafly[NASS Annual Conference]1469 kB