Sundials - World's Oldest Clocks

North American Sundial Society

Selected Sundials of Louisiana

Click on any photo or city name to get more sundial details and more photos.

 
 
St. Francesville Louisiana USA Horizontal Dial 394
A small 9 inch diameter brass horizontal dial sits on top of a cast iron pedestal. The dial face is worn, but readable with Roman numerals and 5-minute graduations. The dial plate is rotated about 40 degrees east of North. To the south of the gnomon is a 2 1/2 inch diameter mirror with unknown use. On left and right of the gnomon is scroll engraving of the equation of time. The dial sits on a 3 foot cast iron pedestal, painted adobe-red. A matching adobe-red dome cap with 8 sides covers the dial. Cap has an acorn handle lift.
 
 
St. John's Newfoundland Canada Horizontal Dial 775
A 10 inch diameter heavily cast bronze horizontal dial with bronze gnomon that was apparently replaced or remounted in the past. The dial face includes hour and half-hour lines and Roman hour numerals from 5 AM to 7 PM. The center of the dial face shows a simplified map of the world. The dial sits atop a stone pedestal with a two-part octagonal base. The base is inscribed with a dedication to the memory of Sir Edgar Rennie Bowring, K.C.M.G. (1858-1943), industrialist, born at St. John's, Newfoundland on August 17, 1858, son of John Bowring and Mary Rennie.
 
 
St. Johns Newfoundland Canada Armillary Dial 132
A 38.5 inch diameter bronze armillary with equatorial, meridian and horizon rings and with Roman hour numerals. Dial sits atop a six foot high concrete pedestal. The dial was restored in 1999 by Memorial University's Technical Services Department to celebrate the Festival of Anniversaries. Lord Taylor, Memorial University's president in the early 1970's, found this 18th century reproduction dial in England and brought it to the university. It has become Memorial University's symbol of exploration and discovery in the world of research.
 
 
St. Louis Missouri USA Equatorial Dial 776
A 10 inch wide, cylindrical-segment equatorial dial 8 inches high, fabricated from a section of large PVC pipe. The dial face is aluminum sheet bonded to the PVC pipe and marked by photochemical engraving with hour lines showing analemmas to correct for EOT; hour lines are corrected for longitude and show both standard and daylight saving Arabic hour numerals. Winter and summer solstices and equinoxes are marked. Time and date are read by the shadow of the intersection of the two gnomon rods. Instructions are included on the dial face and plaque.
 
 
St. Louis Missouri USA Equatorial Dial 777
A cast aluminum equatorial dial 15 inches in diameter with a rotating, two-part, three-dimensional analemmic gnomon; this is a classic Schmoyer dial completed by Bill Gottesman. One gnomon half is used from summer solstice to winter solstice; time is shown by a beam of light passing through the gnomon slit to fall on the hour ring. The other gnomon half is used from winter solstice to summer solstice.
 
 
St. Louis Missouri USA Horizontal Dial 525
This horizontal sundial is a 30 inch diameter and 1.5 inch thick sealed, copper-coated steel plate with cast lead hour markers and weighs 250 pounds. Built in 2002, it was installed in September, 2004 in a private home rear yard. Dial is supported by 6x6 inch pressure treated wood post with 4x4 inch cross frame. Viewing can be arranged by contacting the owner.
 
 
St. Louis Missouri USA Vertical Dial 553
A vertical dial of limestone and copper held in the hands of an angle statue.
 
 
St. Louis Missouri USA Vertical Dial 54
This modernistic vertical south declining dial was designed by Mel Meyer and installed in 1989. The dial is an 8 by 10 foot stainless steel sundial with ribbed hour lines. No numerals are used. The gnomon is a solid triangle 3.5 inches wide by 85 inches high.
 
 
St. Louis Missouri USA Horizontal Dial 836
A horizontal sundial made on an octagonal brass plate, measuring 12 inches from side to side. The engraved hour lines are divided with marks for half, quarter and eighth parts of the hour. The hour numbers themselves are outward facing Roman numerals. The brass gnomon is bent slightly to the west by vandals. The pedestal is 37.5 inches tall with a 17 inch circular top cap of pink marble. Unfortunately the dial is located near a tree, so it is in shade for part of day.
 
 
St. Louis Missouri USA Horizontal Dial 847
The circular bronze dial has a massive triangular gnomon and is kept under a protective plastic dome. In R. McGuire's book, St. Louis Arsenal - Armory Of The West is a picture of the sundial for which the caption reads "On December 12, 1859, master armorer N. Engels, machinist A. Schaedel, and engraver W. Hawksley dedicated a sundial, which they had created entirely from spare ordnance materials. It was a scientifically precise instrument, measuring 17 inches in diameter, and was used for many years as the definitive chronometer of the arsenal. Engraved upon it was a poem entitled 'The Bird of Liberty,' reflecting the patriotic fervor of the day."
 
 
St. Louis Missouri USA Horizontal Dial 848
The original sundial, made in 1841, was 14 inches in diameter and sat on a limestone pedestal 30 inches high. In early drawings from the late 1890's and later photos, the dial had a massive triangular gnomon. For years it served as the post chronometer.
 
 
St. Louis Missouri USA Analemmatic Dial 605
A child-safe compliant surface analemmatic dial located in a roof garden. The dial face includes hour numerals, cardinal directions and moon phases. A nearby plaque give directions for use. The roof area and sundial are open to patients and their parents but public access can be arranged by contacting Mr. Philip Becker, Director.
 
 
St. Louis Missouri USA Horizontal Dial 354
A horizontal dial sculpture called "Child Sundial" depicts a daydreaming child figure playing with a sundial gnomon that is part of a working sundial. The gnomon is about 5 1/2 inches high and the hour lines are adjusted to show standard time in St. Louis. The sculpture and dial are at ground level surrounded by a bed of creeping thyme, perhaps a gentle Herb garden pun. Statue constructed of lead, 12 x 21 inches
 
 
St. Louis Missouri USA Horizontal Dial 622
A 16.5 inch diameter bronze horizontal dial on a stone pedestal in front of the south entrance to the glass-walled Jewel Box building in Forest Park. The dial was erected by the Missouri Society Colonial Dames of America as a tribute to the memory of Mary Harrison Leighton Shields, who organized the Society in 1896 and served as its president until 1913. The dial face is inscribed, "WE LIVE IN DEEDS NOT YEARS." Dial furniture includes an hour glass and eagle wings. The perimeter around the dial is inscribed, "MARY HARRISON LEIGHTON SHIELDS." Dial sits atop a stone pedestal.
 
 
St. Louis Missouri USA Horizontal Dial 626
A unique horizontal dial 28 inches square and 1 inch thick of white Carrara marble with two cast bronze gnomons. Four time systems are shown on the dial. The shadow of the short vertical gnomon near the dial center indicates Ezanic hours based on a 24 equal-hour day with two 12-hour periods starting at sunset; Babylonian hours similarly based on two 12-hour periods starting at sunrise; and two Moslem prayer times, Zuhr and Asr. The polar gnomon shadow indicates hours based on two, 12 equal-hour periods starting at noon and midnight. The polar gnomon support consists of seven rings representing the celestial spheres of Sun, Moon, Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn. Dial furniture includes a Qibla showing the direction to Mecca, N 42.7° for this location. Dial markings are accentuated with inlaid gold leaf. This dial design is based on the Ottoman dial at Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, built about 1480, and on Ibn Al Shatir's dial in Damascus built 1371, the first sundial with a polar gnomon. Dial rests on three large carved marble blocks 42 inches high. The Botanical Gardens are public but require a moderate admission fee.
 
 
St. Louis Missouri USA Horizontal Dial 883
The circular bronze dial sits on an iron pipe, surrounded by a picket fence and protected from the elements by a brass hood. It is a nearly identical dial to the one at the St. Louis Arsenal (NASS dial #847). In R. McGuire's book, "St. Louis Arsenal - Armory Of The West" is a picture of the sundial for which the caption reads "On December 12, 1859, master armorer N. Engels, machinist A. Schaedel, and engraver W. Hawksley dedicated a sundial, which they had created entirely from spare ordnance materials."
 
 
St. Louis Missouri USA Obelisk Dial 885
The obelisk is constructed of North Carolina pink granite. At the base it is 18 x 16 inches and soars 18 feet into the sky. The obelisk displays a cross in its own shadow at solar noon on three days each year – the vernal equinox on about March 21, the summer solstice on about June 21, and the autumnal equinox on about September 22.
 
 
St. Louis Missouri USA Vertical Dial 396
A vertical decliner at the top of the Cupples I building. Given by the class of 1908. Can be seen from the courtyard of Robert S. Brookings building. In 1908 the campus newspaper, the Washington University Student Life, commented that "The new sun dial on Cupples I is now being put into position upon the tablet on the south side of the building?It will be interesting to note the discrepancy between sun time and standard time by comparing with the Varsity clock [a large time piece situated high on the west wall of Brookings Hall, with both clock and dial visible in the quadrangle]." Today the Baumont Pavilion, erected in 1965, blocks a close view of the ornate tablet and dial. Use binoculars from a distance.
 
 
St. Mary's City Maryland USA Cylinder Dial 374
Cement cylinder dial with an inside radius of about 18 inches and a concrete gnomon 5 inches thick. The hour is read on the top 9summer) face in Roman numerals from VII to XVII; the scale is offset for longitude correction. The cylindrical inner face is stainless steel with an engraved grid of quarter hours and months, with an equation of time curve on every hour.
 
 
St. Petersburg Florida USA Equatorial Dial 794
A very large bowstring equatorial dial. The outer diameter of the equatorial ring is 26 feet, the height of the meridian ring is 22 feet above the base and the gnomon rod is 26.5 feet long, making this possibly the largest bowstring dial known at this time. The equatorial ring is marked on two faces with large Roman hour numerals for 7 AM to 5 PM. The dial base includes a large compass rose marked with major directions.