Sundials - World's Oldest Clocks

North American Sundial Society

Features

2000_Sunstone_SanFranciscoRon Anthony, Carl Trost and Mark Gingrich organized the 2000 NASS conference in San Francisco.  A wide variety of sundial papers were presented, including Carl Trost’s description of the 1913 opening of the Ingleside Terrace sundial with a 28-foot gnomon, Robert Kellogg’s description of the “Amazing Maize Maze” the largest “organic” sundial, and educational insights by Mac Oglesby and Paul Lapp who reminded the conferees that “Toves don’t do Trig”.  Download the PDF to read about the other sundial talks and discover the Azimeter and Sawyer Equant dials are all about.   The sundial tour included a visit to the Heliodon at the Energy Center of Pacific Gas & Electric Company, and a tour through San Francisco and Berkely to see a number of dials including the Entrada Court horizontal dial at Ingleside Terracethe large horizontal dial at Hunter’s Ridge and the Navigator’s Sundial on the back of a tortoise in Golden Gate Park, and the Sunstone Alignment stones at the Park and at Lawrence Hall of Science in Berkeley.

Attachments:
Download this file (2000_NASSConference_SanFrancisco.pdf)2000 NASS Conference San Francisco[NASS Annual Conference]6559 kB

1999_LoomisChaffeeDial_WinsorThis year’s NASS conference was held in Hartford, CT with 50 attendees.  There were many presenters from sculptor and sundial designer Robert Adzema to Mike Shaw, one of four attendees from the UK.  There were many interesting dials on display, including Fritz Stumpges “Solar Flair” dial, Larry Bohlayer’s “Sun Vial, Bill Gottesman’s Spiral Sundial, Mac Oglesby’s shadow plane dial, Mayall’s Cube dial at CIGNA, Waugh’s pillar dial at University of Connecticut, and Judy Young’s “Sunwheel” stone alignment circle at University of Massachusetts in Amherst.  Tom Kreyche presented a paper describing his computer program to update and expand NASS’s Dialist’s Companion software while Sara Schechner discussed the interrelation of sundials, time and Christianity, drawing upon many European cathedrals that served as giant meridian sundials.  As with a number of previous conferences, it rained or was sunless for much of the Saturday sundial tour.

Attachments:
Download this file (1999_NASSConference_Hartford.pdf)1999 NASS Conference Hartford[NASS Annual Conference]957 kB

1998_UnivWash_Sullivan_SeattleThe attached PDF file begins “For the second year in a row, the Sun shone brightly on the annual NASS conference,” even though it was held at the University of Washington in Seattle.  A large number of sundial related displays, outdoor demonstrations, and a local tour of Seattle area sundials provided “hands-on” experience for the conferees.  Woody Sullivan, conference host, described the “hands-on” experience of designing and building the large vertical dial on the Physics and Science building.  Len Berggren presented history of gnomonics in medieval Islam, pointing out that the time of afternoon prayer is defined in terms of gnomon shadow length.  The Seattle tour of sundials included the analemmatic sundial in Gasworks Park, dials at Billings Middle School, and the Webster Park Equatorial Sundial among many others.  See what you missed, and download the PDF for all the details.

Attachments:
Download this file (1998_NASSConference_Seattle.pdf)1998 NASS Conference Seattle[NASS Annual Conference]2535 kB

1997_Equatorial_LincolnParkZoo_ChicagoAbout 45 members of NASS attended the third annual conference in the windy city of Chicago. The Adler Planetarium hosted the conference and provided a tour of their fine collection of astrolabes and sundials.   Of particular interest was the special sundial exhibit prepared by Sara Schechner Genuth for the conferees in the History of Astronomy Department. NASS sessions started with John Shephed describing his design of a vertical declining sundial 56 feet wide.  Warren Thom talked about sundial computer aided design using several popular programs.  Fred Sawyer took the mathematical side and presented a new sundial, described as “Ptolemaic Coordinate Sundials” which he invented in response to a British Sundial Society challenge.  Download the PDF for full details.

Attachments:
Download this file (1997_NASSConference_Chicago.pdf)1997 NASS Conference Chicago[NASS Annual Conference]1450 kB

1996_Armillary_PhillipsSquareThe NASS conference was held at the University of Toronto, where a number of unique dials were presented, including Paul Lapp’s garden analemmatic dial, and Bill Buckler’s analemmatic gnomon on an equatorial dial. Sara Schechner Genuth presented a paper on historical dials as evidence of consumer culture and Don Petrie explained his model sundial used to teach gnomonics.   The dial tour included the Royal Botanic Gardens and the Michener Institute of Medical Technology.

Attachments:
Download this file (1996_NASSConference_Toronto_Ontario.pdf)1996 NASS Conference Toronto[NASS Annual Conference]3168 kB

1995_NationalCathedral_4aOur first NASS conference was held in Washington, D.C. with a small group of about a two dozen people meeting at The Smithsonian Institution on the mall.  The group one common interest: sundials.  During the conference, the group was able to visit a special display of dials and rare books on dialing in the Smithsonian collection.  Papers equinoctial clocks, analemmatic sundials and digital sundials were presented.  George McDowell organized a sundial tour of “Twelve Sundials of Washington” that included dials at the National Cathedral, Eastern High School, and an enigmatic sundial at Tudor Place.

Attachments:
Download this file (1995_NASSConference_WashingtonDC.pdf)1995 NASS Conference Washington DC[NASS Annual Conference]2249 kB

NASS_2001_FredSawyerDialIn recognition of Frederick W. Sawyer’s effort as president of The North American Sundial Society, editor of NASS’s journal The Compendium, and for giving his time and talent to sundial design and the promotion of sundialing around the world, NASS commissioned Tony Moss to design and craft a sundial for Fred.

The horizontal dial was presented at the 2001 annual NASS conference.  It has a gold-plated hand-pierced gnomon with his initials that is set on a phosphor bronze plate engraved for his home latitude.

Subcategories

  • Sundials for Starters
    Article Count:
    6
  • Conferences
    Article Count:
    23
  • Sawyer Dialing Prize
    Fred Sawyer, in cooperation with the North American Sundial Society, established a continuing yearly award, the Sawyer Dialing Prize to be presented by NASS to an individual for accomplishments in or contributions to dialing and the dialing community.
    Article Count:
    19
  • Terwilliger Sundials
    In these pages is the famous tub sundial created by Robert Terwilliger using his laser trigon to lay out hour lines on a very irregular surface to create a working sundial.
    Article Count:
    1
  • Biographies

    Who are today's sundial artisans?  Here are several bioghraphies of several artisans that show the unique combination of talents in art, engineering, and mathematics.

    Article Count:
    6